Blurring The Line, ed. by Marty Young – Review by Greg Chapman

12003146_879319075487621_892517258321694034_nBlurring The Line

ed. by Marty Young

Cohesion Press

Review by Greg Chapman

Blurring the Line was definitely not the anthology I expected.

But, in this case, that’s a very good thing.

Described as a collection of fiction/non-fiction, Blurring the Line delivers on its intent of exploring the grey area between real and inventive horror, and in doing so, revealing just how diverse – and satisfying – horror fiction can be.

Commencing with probably the most definitive non-fiction piece, Tom Piccirilli’s Our Doom is Nigh, is a poignant and revelatory insight into his battle with cancer. From there though, the lines do indeed begin to blur. What follows are stories that delve into paranoia, witchcraft, cryptids, human anomalies, conspiracies and several cracking ghost stories.

Some of the stand-out tales included Lisa Morton’s Woollen Shirts and Gumboots, Tim Lebbon’s Clown’s Kiss, Miskatonic Schrödinger by Steven Lloyd Wilson, Consorting With Filth by Lisa L. Hannett, Hoarder by Kealan Patrick Burke, With These Hands by Brett McBean, The Body Finder by Kaaron Warren, Paul Mannering’s Salt on the Tongue and Annie Neugebauer’s Honey.

All in all, the selections by editor Marty Young, are inspired and several of the stories even managed to have me scanning Google to see if there was any truth to them.

The only negative – if there is one – was the inclusion of the “non-fiction” articles interspersed between the stories. Although I believe they were designed to give the reader a taste of the proceeding stories, I found the articles occasionally inhibited the flow of the stories. But this is just the reviewer’s personal opinion.

Blurring the Line is a very solid anthology of horror stories that certainly kept me enthralled and entertained and wondering what is truth and what is fiction.

Recommended.

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Cohesion Press upcoming releases

Cohesion Press continues to be busy and shows no signs of slowing down.

FUBAR by Weston Ochse has just been released. Print and ebook are now live, and the ordering period for the signed/limited edition is open until September.

“A wild blend of nail-biting thriller action and out-of-the shadows horror. This is the supernatural thriller at its most dynamic. Perfect!” —Jonathan Maberry, New York Times bestselling-author of Dead of Night and The King of Plagues

FUBAR Weston Ochse


Also, Cohesion Press has just signed Patrick Freivald for the final three books in his Matt Rowley series. The first two were released by Journalstone, but Cohesion has them from now on.


Their next release will be The Road to Golgotha, through the Cohesion Comics imprint.
For sale online (print) in a week or two, with the official release at Melbourne Oz Comic Con June 27-28. Amanda J Spedding and GN Braun will be there all weekend for signing.


After that, in July and August, they will release the first two of a projected seven-book series (Secret Files of the League of Silence series) by Jack Hanson.
July – Cry Havoc by Jack Hanson
August – Forlorn Hope by Jack Hanson

comingsoon


Their complete release schedule for the near future is:

June – The Road to Golgotha (Cohesion Comic #1)
July – Cry Havoc by Jack Hanson
August – Forlorn Hope by Jack Hanson<
August – SNAFU: Survival of the Fittest
September – Blurring the Line (ed. Marty Young)
October – TBA
November – SNAFU: Hunters featuring James A Moore and Patrick Freivald
December – [Untitled] (Cohesion Comic #2)
January (2016) – TBA
February (2016) – SNAFU: Future Warfare featuring Weston Ochse and Brad Torgersen
March (2016) – TBA
April (2016) – [Untitled] by Patrick Freivald (Matt Rowley 3)
May (2016) – TBA
June (2016) – TBA
July (2016) – TBA
August (2016) – SNAFU: Creature Feature

Reviewers Wanted

Now is the time to get on the Cohesion Press reviewer email list. It’s used to send out press info and ARCs of new releases, and with so many great books lined up for this year alone, you don’t want to miss out.

Please, only people who review for legitimate blog or review sites. Amazon and Goodreads don’t count, nor do personal blogs unless you have a tonne of followers and hits.

If you want to be placed on the list, please email [email protected] with your details and who you review for, or PM Cohesion’s page on Facebook.

ReviewersWanted

SNAFU: An Anthology of Military Horror – review

2014_07_11_front_SWSNAFU: An Anthology of Military Horror

Edited by Geoff Brown and A J Spedding

Cohesion Press

The publisher approached me prior to the publication of this volume and asked if I’d consider writing the Foreword for it. I said, sure, send it over and I’ll have a look. After reading the book, I was more than happy to write the Foreword. Here, as a review, I’m reprinting that Foreword.

War is hell.

Nothing puts people closer to their base state than a threat to their life. Nothing reveals their animal nature more than the desire for survival at any cost. People trained for war have to deal with these extremes time after time, surviving for a greater purpose. Or at least, one hopes so. Because survival in a personal fight can be selfish, but survival in war might mean the fate of nations, or even species. And pretty much every permutation of that kind of fight for survival is explored in the stories you’re about to read.

Don’t be fooled into thinking an anthology of military horror is just a book full of Platoon or Aliens knock-offs. In these pages, the variety of story you’ll find is staggering.

Historical and imagined, science-fictional and contemporary. Mythos, the Wild West and Special Forces. Great wars, small wars and the American Civil War. Shapeshifters and ghosts and extraterrestrial parasites. Japanese demons and supernatural special agents. Monsters large and small. Battles fought with raging gunfire and earth-shattering explosions and battles fought cold, with paper trails and subterfuge. Battles won and lost in moments and battles that stretch across aeons.

There’s great variety in story style and length too. From very short stories to novella length yarns with lots of meat ready to be stripped off their bones. This book is a fine achievement and a great example of a theme superbly explored.

You’ll enjoy all the approaches here and the great writing from both established names and emerging talents. But no matter the variety, one thing that doesn’t change from tale to tale is the underlying truth evident in every one. Lives are at risk, great stakes are being played but throughout every page we’re never allowed to forget that regardless of the nature of the enemy, the real horror is war itself.

Alan Baxter, NSW Australia, 2014

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The New Look Carnies

The new cover for the re-release of Carnies, by Martin Livings, has just been revealed, and it looks fantastic. Coming in 2014 from Cohesion Press.

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The small town of Tillbrook has a secret. One that has been kept for over a hundred years.

Journalist David Hampden needs a good story to resurrect his flagging career. His damaged brother, Paul, just needs to find some meaning for his life.When David is alerted to a century-old carnival, the idea of a feature story is too good to pass up, so he drags Paul along to Tillbrook to act as his photographer. What they find is darker than they could ever imagine.Paul becomes part of the exotic world of the Dervish Carnival, est. 1899, and David must risk everything to save his brother. Even though Paul might not want to be saved.

Come on in, and enjoy the show. No photos allowed.

More details soon…